Residencia Cautiño in Guayama, Puerto Rico

Here are some sketches I made while assisting my wife and her team of students when documenting the Casa Cautiño in Guayama. This was the 1st time our students entered the prestigious Charles E. Peterson Drawing Competition and won 1st Prize for their field notes and measured drawings. (For winning drawings and information see previous post and http://www.nps.gov/hdp/competitions/Peterson_winners.htm)

 Floor plan (partial, a 20th century addition (right) is ommitted from the drawing)  
 Spatial axon illustrating the spatial arrangement. 

Casa Wiechers-Villaronga in Ponce, Puerto Rico

During the past summer days my wife Claudia and I led a team of students to prepare field notes and measured drawings of this turn-of-the-19th-century masterpiece designed by Alfredo B. Wiechers.

For the 2nd consecutive time- our students have been awarded 1st place at the Charles E. Peterson Prize Measured Drawing Student Competition (2015 & 2014). The competition is co-sponsored annually by the National Park Service, Heritage Documentation Program, The Athenaeum of Philadelphia and the American Institute of Architects. 

For more information about the Prize: http://www.nps.gov/hdp/competitions/Peterson_winners.htm

Here are a few sketches I made while assisting the team of students prepare their field notes and documentation drawings. 

 Floor plan

  Following the 19th century tradition I made a composition simultaneously illustrating both interior and exterior views of the dining room area. 
 
Although I like perspective drawings I prefer these analytical drawings. Even if too personal, (meaning that they are really not intended for others), these drawings are essential tools for helping me understand the spatial configuration (and relations) of given building.  

 For illustrating purposes, I have included this sketch of the main façade I made (and posted) a few years ago. 

Centro de Estudios Avanzados, Viejo San Juan (Antiguo Seminario Conciliar Español)

 Floor Plan and Longitudinal Section (partial, continues on next drawing).

Planta y sección longitudinal (parcial; continúa en el próximo dibujo).

  Longitudinal Section (continuation), Axonometric of principal spatial configuration. 

Sección longitudinal (continuación); axonométrico de los principales espacios. 

 Perspective of the Chapel. 

Perspectiva de la capilla.

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Frederick C. Robie House

Designed to evoke the expansive landscape of the Midwest, the Robie House characterizes horizontality with its forms, spaces and even construction materials. For example, the proportions and arrangement of the main living room and dining hall (one next to the other, aligned along their longitudinal axis) as well as, the repetition of the vertical windows and doors along these main spaces, underline the horizontality of the residence. Even the brickwork emphasize the horizontal plane. Roman brick (characteristically more elongated than regular brick) is set on cement mortar. However, contrary to tradition, horizontal mortar joints are differentiated from the vertical ones. The former are highlighted with white cement, while the latter are camouflaged with the red bricks.   Needless to say, the highlight of this masterpiece is its spatial sequence, which is exacerbated by the guided tour, although sadly, not by the tour guides. As with every great architectural work, one is guided by spatial elements and can easily traverse the spaces without having to repeat spaces along the spatial sequence.  As it was customarily for Wright, the main entrance of the house is hidden away from the street. Setback from the sidewalk, the entrance allows passage through the northwest side to the under level where a staircase invites you to climb towards the lighted upper level. Once upstairs, the space opens up towards the living room while circling the fireplace that divides the living room from the dining room. From the living room the view opens up towards the street inviting one out to the open terraces. The continuous horizontal band of the wood and stained glass doors invites to the dining room concluding the spatial sequence of the main spaces.